Interview Practice: Graphs, Advanced Trees & RegEx

Interview Practice: Graphs, Advanced Trees & RegEx

We’ve just added three-brand new computer science topics to Interview Practice! Get ready to dive deep on Graphs, Trees: Advanced, and RegEx. We’ve added these topics to our Extra Credit learning plan, which covers all of the topics in Interview Practice. 

Why are these topics so important to know for technical interviews? Read on for a brief introduction to each concept!

Graphs

Graphs Interview Practice TopicA graph is an abstract data structure composed of nodes and the edges between nodes. Graphs are a useful way of demonstrating the relationship between different objects. For instance, did you know that you can represent social networks as graphs? Or that the 6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon game can be modeled as a graph problem? Graph questions are really common in technical interviews. In some cases, the question will be explicitly about graphs, but in other cases the connection is more subtle. Read our tutorial to get up to speed on this topic and to learn how to identify this kind of question. Then practice your skills on graph questions from real technical interviews!

Trees: Advanced

Trees: Advanced Interview Practice TopicA tree is a data structure composed of parent and child nodes. Each node contains a value and a list of references to its child nodes. Tree traversal and tree implementation problems come up a lot in technical interviews. Common use-cases for an interview are: needing to store and do searches on data that is sorted in some way; needing to manage objects that are grouped by an attribute (think computer file systems); or implementing a search strategy like backtracking. You need to be very familiar with how to deal with these kinds of questions! (The tasks in Trees: Advanced ramp up in difficulty from the ones you get in the Trees: Basic category, so make sure you finish those questions before moving on to these ones!)

RegEx

RegEx Interview Practice TopicA regex is a string that encodes a pattern to be searched for (and perhaps replaced). They let you find patterns of text, validate data inputs, and do text replacement operations. A well-written regex can make it easier to solve really tricky interview questions like “Find all of the 10-digit phone numbers in a block of text, where the area code might or might not be surrounded by parentheses and there might or might not be either a space or a dash between the first and second number groupings”. While the specifics of how to implement a regex can vary between languages, the basics are pretty much the same. In the topic tutorial, we cover regex character classes, quantifiers, anchors, and modifiers and how to use them to write a good regex.    

Start now

These topics might not get asked in every interview, but they’re important to know! Read the tutorials about each concept, then solve the real interview tasks to practice your skills and solidify your understanding of the topic. (Learn more about how we’ve updated the Interview Practice experience to make it an even better practice and preparation tool.)

If you’re signed up for the Extra Credit learning plan, these topics have been added to your Interview Practice page already. If you’re signed up for a different learning plan, you can switch over to Extra Credit. Or you can sign up for a customizable Freestyle plan and add these topics!

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