Category: Job Search

Finding a new job can be time consuming and tough, especially for developers. Let us help out with tips on how to simplify and speed up your job search process.

Make Your LinkedIn Profile Work For You

Make Your LinkedIn Profile Work For You

If you were a small business owner and someone offered you a free billboard on the freeway, you’d take it in a heartbeat, right? Free advertising in a high traffic area! That’s a no-brainer – of course you’d want that.

And that, friends, is pretty much exactly what LinkedIn is: a free billboard for YOU.

Recruiters from tech companies are on LinkedIn all the time, plugging in keywords, looking for leads. The search interface makes sourcing on LinkedIn easy for them, so of course they use it. They’re looking for you! They want to give you a job!

So it just makes sense that you, whether you’re an active or passive job seeker, should also be on LinkedIn. Building your profile up into your own personal billboard makes it easy for all those searching recruiters to find you! It’s a hugely valuable tool that makes you visible and accessible to employers who are actively seeking candidates with the skill set that you have.

Fixing your LinkedIn profile can take a little bit of time, depending on how empty or out of date it is, but it’s totally worth it to spend some quality time putting it together. If you’re actively looking for new programming jobs or maybe just open to considering new options, LinkedIn is going to help you out.

Connie Kehn, Lead Talent Engineer at CodeFights, sees a lot of LinkedIn profiles while she’s working with engineers who are using CodeFights to find new jobs. And she used to be a recruiter for Tesla, so she knows what people on the other end of the equation are looking for too! She says, “Take advantage of your LinkedIn. It’s a free billboard space for you to talk about your strengths, your history, your skills, and what kind of work you’re looking for. Recruiters use that! When you’re on the hunt, build it up. You can always take it down later.”

So without further ado, here are CodeFights’ top 10 tips for making your LinkedIn work for you!

  1. Fill out the entire profile. If you leave sections of your LinkedIn profile blank, not only are you missing out on opportunities to tell recruiters who you are and showcase what you’ve done, but you also might be hidden in searches. The LinkedIn platform actually prioritizes complete profiles! So if you’re not filling it out, your profile might not be surfacing in recruiters’ searches.
  2. Stand out with a good headline. Since this is one of the first things someone looking at your LinkedIn profile will see, make it count! Your headline should be descriptive and highlight your interests or specializations. Think specific, not general. And while you can get a little creative if you want to, don’t go overboard. The recruiter needs to be able to quickly decide whether or not you fit the bill. So a headline like Experienced Scala Wrangler Seeking New Pastures is eye-catching but still descriptive, while one like Programming Mermaid doesn’t really give a recruiter much of a sense of what you do. 
  3. Sum yourself up. Your summary should be 40 words or more in order to rank in searches, but don’t go overboard in the other direction either! If your summary is too long, pertinent information might get lost as recruiters skim through. Write in the first person about yourself (“I’m a web developer” vs “Janet is a web developer”), and keep your language natural! Use the old writing adage of “show, don’t tell.” Instead of saying that you’re enthusiastic about Python, be specific: “I taught myself Python two years ago and have been using it whenever possible ever since.”
  4. Add keywords. Whether recruiters are doing searches or already looking at your profile, they’re looking for certain, specific things. You can think of these as your own personal search keywords, and you should make sure that you’ve got these keywords in your Summary, Skills, Experience, Projects, and Recommendations sections. Obviously you don’t want to misrepresent yourself or try to do some keyword-stuffing that looks unnatural. But you do want to make sure that you’re showing up in the right searches! So if you’re looking for a job as a Rails developer but you don’t list Ruby or Rails anywhere in your profile, you may as well not be looking for a Rails dev job at all.
  5. Show off your work. Since you’re a smart engineer you will, of course, be adding a link to your GitHub from your LinkedIn (quite possibly in the Summary section). But remember, recruiters are skimming, and you want to make it easy for them to see what you’ve been working on! Add information about projects that you’ve done in – what else? – the Projects section. Make sure to include relevant details like languages, frameworks, and whether it was a solo project or something you worked on with other people. This is an easy way for the recruiter to get a better feel for your work. Not to mention all those keywords that you’re adding to the descriptions boost your chances of showing up in the right recruiter’s search!
  6. Show off your education! Remember how we said to fill out your entire profile? Yeah, that goes double for the Education section. Maybe you didn’t go to school for computer science or a related field. Or maybe you didn’t go to school at all. Not a problem! Chances are good that you’ve got some relevant coursework, certifications, or seminars under your belt that you could add to your profile. Recruiters like to see this because it’s a little confirmation for them that you’re qualified and competent enough to do the programming jobs they’re working on filling.
  7. Hide the competition. You know that sidebar on the right side of your LinkedIn profile that says “People also viewed” and has a list of other people? You’re going to want to hide that. Go to Settings, then Privacy, and change this to “No”. Because those other people that LinkedIn users are also looking at probably look a lot like you in terms of work or educational history and/or skills, meaning they show up in the same searches… meaning they’re the competition.
  8. Get endorsements. While you’re busy adding your own personal keywords to your Skills section, ask coworkers, classmates, clients, or acquaintances who are familiar with your work to endorse you for those skills. While this actually won’t rank you any higher in searches, it does give the recruiter who’s looking at your profile some very positive cues: Not only do you say that you know Sass, Emily who you worked with at your last company says you know Sass too!
    • Optional: Get recommendations. On a related note, it looks really good when you have recommendations from supervisors, clients, or teachers, especially if they reference specific projects you’ve worked on or things you’re really good at.
  9. Order your sections. By now, you’ve probably noticed that you can move the sections of your profile around. Use this to your advantage! If you just got out of school or you’re switching careers and you don’t have much work experience yet, move your Education and Projects sections up to the top. Been in the tech industry for ages? Keep your Experience section at the top.
  10. Personalize your URL. Which URL would you rather have a recruiter send to a hiring manager: linkedin.com/in/joe-cool-20a70070 or linkedin.com/in/josephcool? While this isn’t a make-or-break situation, having a good personal URL can give your profile an extra layer of professionalism and help build your personal brand.

Bonus: Don’t leave your LinkedIn profile picture blank! Recruiters respond to photos because it helps them create a more complete picture of a candidate in their minds. You don’t have to go get professional headshots unless you want to, but you should make sure that the photo is clear, well-lit, and work-appropriate (no bar-hopping pictures, please). And while you’re at it, add a banner picture too! It makes your profile look more professional, more complete, and more you. After all, what’s a billboard without an eye-catching image?

Doable, right? And once you’ve got your LinkedIn profile fully set up, it’s just a matter of upkeep: adding new jobs, certifications, and skills as you get them. Whether you’re actively looking for new tech jobs or just interested in seeing what comes your way, your personal LinkedIn billboard is a sure-fire way to make sure that recruiters see you for the talented, savvy programmer that you are.

On the job hunt? Read these articles too:

Resumes. Not fun, right? But they’re a necessary part of the job search process a lot of the time. Read Make Your Engineering Resume Stand Out to find out how to write a resume that really highlights your programming skills and experiences and makes you stand out from the crowd of applicants.

Once you’re on a company’s radar, there’s still a few steps before you make it to the in-person technical interview! First, you’re going to have to get past the recruiter phone screen. Read Ace Your Phone Screen By Telling Your Story, Pt. 1  to learn how to craft a personal elevator pitch that will resonate with recruiters. Then check out Ace Your Phone Screen By Telling Your Story, Pt. 2 for tips on how to wow the recruiter during the phone screen itself.

Tell us…

Have you ever found a job opportunity through LinkedIn? Have any great tips for making your LinkedIn profile stand out from other engineers’ profiles? Let us know on the forum!

Ace Your Phone Screen By Telling Your Story, Pt. 2

Ace Your Phone Screen By Telling Your Story, Pt. 2

In Part 1 of this series, you learned how to craft a Story that will resonate with recruiters. Now we’ll talk about exactly how to tell the recruiter your Story during your phone screen.

So you’ve prepared your Story and practiced it a few times. You’ve got your next phone screen scheduled. Now you just need to wow the recruiter!

Be ready

When it’s time for the phone screen, be ready at the agreed-upon time. The recruiter may call a few minutes late, and you shouldn’t take this personally, but on your end you should be 100% ready. Make sure that you’re in a quiet spot and that your phone is fully charged! While this might seem obvious, every recruiter can tell you stories about candidates who took the phone call on the subway, or in a too-loud coffee shop, or… Well, you get the picture. Somewhere other than a quiet, calm place with no background interference that might make it hard for the recruiter to concentrate on what you’re saying. And give yourself a little padding at the end of the scheduled time. If the phone screen is going well and runs a little long, you don’t want to have to cut it short because you have another appointment.

You want to have enough time to finish up this conversation!

Tell your Story

Recruiters will often lead with an open ended question like “Tell me a little bit about yourself.” The purpose of this is two-fold: they want to put you at ease, and they want to get a sense of who you are and what you’re about. The recruiter likely has your resume and your LinkedIn profile in front of them while you’re talking, so don’t just start reciting bullet points. Instead, this is when you’re going to tell the recruiter your Story. At this point, keep the narrative at a high level (think generalities, not specifics). You can dive into the details later if they’re relevant and will drive your Story forward.

Let’s discuss

Your Story isn’t a monologue. Instead, it’s an invitation for the recruiter to ask questions! If you find that you get lost when the recruiter asks a question, it can be worthwhile to keep a list of the high points on hand during the phone screen so that you don’t miss entire portions of your personal narrative.

Talking tech

Even though recruiters tend not to be very technical, as the gatekeepers of the interview process they need to hear that you’re technically competent enough to get to the next round. Be prepared to talk about languages, frameworks, etc. so that they can get a sense of your proficiency level. Part of your Story should be a quantification of how well you know the tools that you have listed on your resume and LinkedIn. Be honest about this stuff! “Familiar but rusty” isn’t going to disqualify you in most cases, and it’s going to come out sooner rather than later if you’ve overstated your skills.

Context, context, context

Never forget why you’re talking to the recruiter – you are interested in a particular position! This context will help you tailor your Story to the specific role and company in question. For instance, if you’re interviewing for a role at a startup, discuss projects or anecdotes that highlight your flexibility, agility, and sense of urgency. Or, if you’re interviewing for a role at a larger company, highlight your commitment to iteration, optimization, and process. Think about why you’re excited about the role or company, and this will come through in your answers.

Stay positive

Never trash talk employers, even when it’s deserved! Keep things positive and professional at all times. Negativity is a big red flag for recruiters.

Check in

While most recruiter phone screens tend to take between 30 minutes to an hour, sometimes they can seem to last forever. Talking about yourself for that long can be hard! It’s okay to check in with the recruiter if you feel like you’ve been talking too much. Don’t be afraid to stop and ask if there’s anything else they want to know about.

Question everything

Always be prepared with some questions! Be sure to do some preliminary homework on the company. Google them to find some recent articles, and spend some time on their website. This will definitely guide a few specific questions. A few good generic ones:

  • “What will role be immediately responsible for/what would I be working on first?”
  • “Is this role new? If so, how is <company> building out the team?”
  • “Can you tell me about professional development at <company>?”
  • “What does the career path/growth for <role> look like?”
  • “What are you most excited about for <company> this year? What brought you there? What keeps you there?”

And finally, never ask about money first. If that’s what you lead with, that’s what you seem to care about most.

Finish strong

The end of your conversation with the recruiter is the perfect opportunity to seal the deal! Tie elements of your Story into specifics about the role and company: “After chatting with you, I’m really excited about x,y,z because it fits in with a,b,c that I’m bringing to the table.” Emphasize that you’re really interested. Now’s not the time to play it cool!

Do you want that job?
The recruiter should already be able to tell you want the job. Don’t make them ask.

And always ask about what the next steps are and what you can do to prepare for them. This shows that you’re proactive, and it’s always a great signal to recruiters.

Congratulations!

You made it past the recruiter gatekeeper! You’re not out of the interview labyrinth – heck, you really just got started – but you’re one step closer to getting that job offer. Put the time and effort into crafting a cohesive, compelling Story before you start off into the interview labyrinth. It’s going to pay off. Not only will you be able to use it in in phone screens, as we’ve discussed in this article, but you’ll be able to use large parts of it in the actual interview as well.

You’re reading an article about how to ace recruiter phone screens, so my spidey senses tell me you might be looking for a job! Did you know that CodeFights can connect you with hundreds of tech companies that are actively seeking qualified engineers – all with only one application? Head to codefights.com/jobs and start finding that dream job today!  

Tell us…

Do you have any tried-and-true tips for doing well on recruiter phone screens? Tell us over on the CodeFights forum!

Ace Your Phone Screen By Telling Your Story, Pt. 1

Ace Your Phone Screen By Telling Your Story, Pt. 1

Sometimes getting through the interview process can feel like trying to find your way through a maze. Scratch that, a labyrinth. One with a bunch of traps and scary parts. (It’s not a perfect metaphor, but work with me here.) There are almost always some predictable stages in the process, though, and one of these is the recruiter phone screen. This is where the recruiter gets a sense of who you are as a candidate and whether you’re worth moving along to the next step. So you can think of the recruiter as the gatekeeper to the labyrinth. You need to get past them in order to get further into the maze, so that you can find your way through, so that you can get to the end, which is of course the amazing job offer. 

Sometimes the end of the labyrinth seems really far away.

Your Story 

To get past this recruiter gatekeeper, you need to have a Story. Not just a story, but a Story. Your Story must be a cohesive narrative that describes your professional path. Your Story will be personal to you, of course, because it’s yours, but the recruiter will be looking for certain cues in your Story that indicate to them whether you’d be a good fit for the role and for the company. If the recruiter doesn’t hear what they need to hear, chances are you won’t be making it to the next, more technical parts of the interview process. So while it’s tempting to dismiss the recruiter phone screen as a mere formality, in reality it’s hugely important. Because without it, you’re done.

The interview process is like a labyrinth
The recruiter probably doesn’t have hair like this, but you can’t tell since it’s a phone screen.

Make it cohesive

Create a narrative that helps recruiters understand your professional path. In a lot of ways, this narrative is similar to your personal elevator pitch – just with a lot more detail. Most people aren’t great with coming up with this sort of thing on the fly, which is why it’s important to prepare your Story ahead of time.

Cover your bases

Your Story should cover your education, your professional history, any personal history that might impact your professional history, and your professional skills. (What do I mean by personal history that impacts your professional history? Think things like: A cross-country move for a partner that resulted in a few months where you were looking for work.) You want the recruiter to get a really good sense of who you are professionally – where you’ve been, where you are now, and where you’d like to go. It’s fine to sprinkle in a few personal details like your hobbies, but keep these brief.

Frame it

Your career path, including any pit stops and pivots, needs to make sense to the recruiter. Even if something isn’t part of a plan, you will be able to work it into the narrative. Framing is everything. For example, if you got laid off from your sales job and then decided to switch careers and become a developer, you can frame that layoff as the best thing that ever happened to you because it gave you the chance to pursue your real passion. It would also be a great chance to talk about any sales skills that make you a strong developer (great communicator, good at working in distributed teams, etc.) List out your work history. If a piece of it doesn’t flow naturally with the rest, work on framing it so that it makes sense in context.  

Explain yourself

Be prepared to explain any gaps in your employment, because the recruiter will ask about them. In general, these gaps aren’t worrisome as long as you have a good explanation for them! (A big exception to this is quitting a job without having anything else lined up. The recruiter might take this as a signal that you have trouble sticking with a company.) Taking a sabbatical is fine – just make sure you have a great reason for it. This is another case in which having your Story prepared is key.

Focus on action and impact

Part of crafting your Story is having some stock anecdotes that you can refer to in pretty much any phone screen. Be prepared with a few projects or stories that you can walk the recruiter through. Recruiters want to hear that you can break things down into manageable chunks and explain them. In these anecdotes, focus on action and impact rather than on what your job duties are/were. State of what your impact was, followed by an explanation of the problem you solved and the specific actions you took.

Practice makes perfect

You might feel silly doing it, but it’s absolutely worthwhile to get some help while you’re crafting your Story. Practice in front of friends. They’ll be able to help you clarify your Story or tighten the narrative. It’s also useful to have them pretend to be a recruiter and ask you some questions.

Sometimes it will take a few tries to get your Story right. You should prepare it beforehand, of course, but you may also find that it evolves over the course of a few phone screens into a Story that resonates with recruiters.

phone screen
You’re so ready for this.

You’re reading an article about how to ace recruiter phone screens, so my spidey senses tell me you might be looking for a job. Did you know that CodeFights can connect you with hundreds of tech companies that are actively seeking qualified engineers – all with only one application? Head to codefights.com/jobs and start finding that dream job today!

Stay tuned!

Now that you’ve put some serious time and effort into crafting your personal Story, it’s time to put it into action! In Part 2, we talk about how to effectively tell your Story to a recruiter.

Tell us…

How do you prepare for recruiter phone screens? Tell us over on the CodeFights forum!

 

Make Your Engineering Resume Stand Out

Make Your Engineering Resume Stand Out

Love ’em or hate ’em (and we’re guessing you don’t love them), resumes are still part of the typical job search process. But putting your resume together can feel like one of the hardest parts of the whole thing! What should you include? What should you leave out? And do you need to include your home address? (Hint: City and state? Sure. Street address? NO.)

A typical engineering job posting can generate hundreds of applications. Only a relatively small percentage of those resumes ever make it in front of a recruiter – and the percentage of those applications that lead to interviews is tiny.

Make your resume stand out
This monkey is having trouble with his resume.

With odds like those, you need to ensure that your resume stands out.

Caity Barnes, recruiter extraordinaire at CodeFights, is going to let you in on some insider knowledge: exactly what she looks for when she’s looking at resumes for engineering roles.

“In a lot of ways, writing a good engineering resume isn’t any different than writing any other kind of resume – make sure it’s well-formatted and that everything’s spelled right. But there are some really specific things that I look for when we’re trying to fill engineering roles.”

Format

  • Recruiters tend to scan resumes in a very specific order. They look at your geographic location, the last job you had, and your education, then the skills list. If they get past that point, that’s when they’ll dive into the other jobs that you’ve listed, and then at projects, achievements, and anything else you’ve included. 
  • If you try to get creative with formatting, fonts, or layout, Caity says that many recruiters will glance at it, decide that it’ll be too hard to scan, and toss it. Don’t let this happen to you! (This applies less if you’re applying for a design job, of course, but most CodeFighters are probably applying for engineering jobs.)
  • A one-page resume is best. If you just can’t cut it down that much, at least make sure that the most important stuff is on the first page. Many recruiters won’t make it further. Hook their attention by putting the most eye-catching stuff first.
  • For every job you list, make it easy for the recruiter to see the company’s name, your title, and how long you were there.
  • Bullet points are your friend! Instead of writing in paragraphs, use bullet points. They’re much easier for recruiters to scan.
  • Don’t talk about yourself in the third person – who are you, the Queen of England? Instead of saying “Bart designed and implemented a user feedback module using Django”, say “I designed and implemented…” Or better yet, since you’re using bullet points, say “Designed and implemented…”
  • In Caity’s opinion, it’s not necessary to include an objective statement at the top of your resume. They’re usually so generic that they’re not useful, and recruiters tend to gloss over them. If you do choose to include one, make it a statement about the kind of company culture that you’re looking for, instead of the kind of work you want to do.
  • Caity says, “I don’t care if you went to the best school in the country – your work experience is more important!” If you’re a very recent grad, you can put the Education section at the top, but otherwise put it at the bottom of the page.
  • Run your resume through spell check and grammar check, and get a few different people to proofread it. While it might seem unimportant – damn it, Jim, you’re an engineer, not an editor! – in some cases a typo or incomprehensible sentence might disqualify you immediately.
Jim, your resume is a mess.
Jim, your resume is a mess.

Content

  • Make sure that you include relevant keywords in your resume. Caity says that when a recruiter’s skimming, they need to be able to pick out important items immediately. And these keywords will change depending on the type of jobs you’re applying for. Think about the skills you’d be highlighting if you were applying for front end jobs vs Java engineering jobs.
  • Be thoughtful about how you include skill items like languages or frameworks. If you list Go, there’s a big difference having used it daily on the job vs having taken a 30 minute seminar on it 2 years ago. Recruiters want to be able to get a sense of how proficient you are. It’s also helpful if you can talk about what you did with these tools so that the recruiter can weight them accordingly.
  • Keep in mind that recruiters tend not to be super technical. From Caity: “We know more about impact than super technical details, so focus on business outcomes that you were a part of.” It’s also helpful to quantify your contributions. (For instance: Were you an individual contributor or part of a team? Was it a big or small team? How many concurrent users did your tool support? How much data did it process daily/weekly?)
  • Try to highlight solo projects or projects to which you contributed a lot, whether they’re for work or side projects. Creating something from scratch is huge and shows initiative, and it’s a great signal to recruiters that you’re a problem solver.
  • “Spell as much out for the recruiter as possible,” Caity says. They are not going to have time to do internet detective work, at least on the first pass. If you worked at a small startup, a short blurb about what the company is helpful. What industry is it in, what size is it, what sort of funding did it get? And if there’s a short tenure on your resume (less than a year), call it out and explain why you left – contract ended, company went under, etc.
  • Put links to your GitHub and your LinkedIn, because they give the recruiter a good overall picture of you. Including other social media can be a little tricker. What does your Twitter feed look like? If you tweet about work-appropriate and relevant topics, go for it. Otherwise, leave it off your resume. Same goes for your blog.
  • Speaking of GitHub, make sure that your profile is something that you’re proud of. Caity says that most recruiters will share it with their hiring managers or interviewing teams to review before taking next steps with candidates. So take some time to clean yours up. Repos that are your own work, rather than forks off other people’s, are good, as is a strong commit history.
  • For recent grads or students – if your GPA is lower than 3.5, don’t include it. If you’ve taken advanced courses on really relevant topics (especially if they were practical, rather than theoretical), you can list them in your Education section. And remember that class projects or coursework aren’t the same thing as side projects, and recruiters won’t weigh them the same.
  • Feel free to put your personality into the resume. What are your hobbies and special interests? Caity says that recruiters love being able to get a sense of who you are! But this stuff should go at the bottom of the page. Remember, recruiters scan top to bottom. You need to put all of the important, must-see stuff at the top of the page.

tl;dr

To boil all of these down into a few principles: Your resume should be clear, concise, and easy to digest. Keep the layout simple and easy to scan. In terms of content, include information that makes it so the recruiter doesn’t have to guess about your history or do extra digging on the internet.

Remember, recruiters aren’t maliciously ignoring your resume! They’re trying to optimize the number of resumes that they can look at for any given engineering job in order to quickly find the most qualified candidates. If you follow these guidelines, your resume stands a much better chance of making it into the “follow-up” pile.

Your resume looks amazing
Your resume looks amazing!

You’re reading an article about how to make your resume stand out, so my spidey senses tell me you might be looking for a job! Did you know that CodeFights can connect you with hundreds of tech companies that are actively seeking qualified engineers – all with only one application? Head to codefights.com/jobs and start finding that dream job today!  

Tell us…

Do you have any tried-and-true tips on how to make your resume stand out? Head over to the CodeFights forum and let us know!

CodeFights’ Top 5 Interview Tips for Developers

CodeFights’ Top 5 Interview Tips for Developers

Finding a new job can be a long process that takes weeks… or even months. This tedious process becomes amplified for software engineers. Since software engineering is a hard skill, most companies try to devise various ways of assessing that skill during the interview. This adds more time, layers of complexity, and obstacles to the job seeking process.

At CodeFights, we help software engineers practice and improve their skills through our gamified educational platform. We also connect them to hundreds of top companies when they’re ready for their next adventure. This means that we get to see what technical interviews are like across many different companies and what developers can do to increase their chances of success.

Top 5 tips for technical interviews

We’ve taken what we’ve learned and distilled it into 5 cardinal rules for engineers who want to make the interview process less painful and score their dream job:

  1. Practice using real interview questions! Great developers often think “This is what I do for a living and I’m good at it”. This makes it tempting to walk into an interview without having practiced much. But the reality is that the interview questions you’ll face at most companies are miles away from what you do at your day job. Doing some research and practicing using real questions that the company uses in its interviews will pay off big-time during the actual interview. There aren’t many high-quality free resources available for this, so we’ve tapped into the knowledge base of our large community to create Interview Practice. Interview Practice is a collection of real interview questions asked at top tech companies, categorized by company and by topic.
  2. Ask a lot of questions during the interview. Some engineers think that asking questions is a sign of poor skill or a lack of understanding, but in reality it’s the opposite. Most questions that you’ll be asked during technical interviews are intentionally vague. The interviewer’s goal is to see if you can ask the right questions before diving in. The worst thing you can do during a technical interview is solve something that you weren’t asked to solve! So ask questions until you are absolutely sure you have all the details.
  3. Use the collective knowledge of your own network and information from sites like Glassdoor to find out what the interview process at the company is like. At some companies (like Google), you interview with 4-5 people onsite and they all have to say “yes” for you to be hired. At others (like Oracle), you still interview with 4-5 people, but they are all on different teams. As long as one says “yes”, then you’re in. Knowing what you are dealing with and what the thinking process behind the scenes is will dramatically improve your chances of doing well in the interview.
  4. Apply to as many companies as you can. Some candidates make the mistake of only talking to a few select companies. They’re basically trying to hit a bullseye with only a few shots! This only works in theory. In practice, it’s very hard for you as an outsider to understand what a company is like and what they work on. So interviews are also a way for you to interview the company and see if it’s something you are ready to commit to. On top of that, doing more interviews provides you with much-needed practice. And when you finally get to the offer stage, having several offers helps you negotiate the best compensation package.
  5. Be mentally prepared for a negative outcome. Interviews are run by human beings, and human beings tend to be quite subjective. So no matter how good you are and how much you prepare, most of your interviews are going to have a negative outcome. You have to be mentally prepared for this. Many candidates take it very personally when a company comes back to them with a “no”. By setting realistic expectations at the outset and treating each interview as an experience to learn from, every “no” you receive – and you will get some! – won’t feel like the end of the world.

Job interviews are inevitably stressful. Engineering interviews are even more so because they try to directly evaluate your skills. It’s natural to be nervous, but the more you prepare, the better equipped you will be to ace whatever the interviewer throws your way.

Join us!

At CodeFights, we try our best to keep our interview process interesting and fun, and we’re actively growing our team. Are you passionate about changing the future of education and talent discovery? Check out our jobs page and apply!

Tell us…

What are your sure-fire interviewing secrets? Let us know what you think on the CodeFights forum!